What Are Friends For

Weak Tie Friends

March 02, 2021 Gabrielle Ruiz & Pallavi Sastry Season 3 Episode 5
What Are Friends For
Weak Tie Friends
Chapters
What Are Friends For
Weak Tie Friends
Mar 02, 2021 Season 3 Episode 5
Gabrielle Ruiz & Pallavi Sastry

In this week's episode, we share our thoughts on the article "The Pandemic Has Erased Entire Categories of Friendship" by Amanda Mull. What do weak ties, mean to us, and why do we miss them SO DAMN MUCH? Listen to find out. Check out the article here https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/01/pandemic-goodbye-casual-friends/617839/ Get free delivery on your first grocery order of $35 or more at instacart.oloiyb.net/WAFF

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/waffpodcast) or follow us everywhere @waffpodcast

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/waffpodcast)

Show Notes Transcript

In this week's episode, we share our thoughts on the article "The Pandemic Has Erased Entire Categories of Friendship" by Amanda Mull. What do weak ties, mean to us, and why do we miss them SO DAMN MUCH? Listen to find out. Check out the article here https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/01/pandemic-goodbye-casual-friends/617839/ Get free delivery on your first grocery order of $35 or more at instacart.oloiyb.net/WAFF

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/waffpodcast) or follow us everywhere @waffpodcast

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/waffpodcast)

Pallavi Sastry:

No really What are friends for? friends are for empty your cup and for reminiscing of pre pandemic days. Hello everybody. I'm Pallavi Sastry

Gabrielle Ruiz:

and I'm Pallavi's best friend Gabrielle Ruiz and the topic at hand Gabrielle we are being very good students today and I love episodes like this so that we can learn as well as read our take Yeah, yeah, exactly. Well, it's good. I like homework in this way it's it's good you know, entering the maternity world and I'm pregnant right now about seven months when we were recording this on the fourth of February 2021. And me and baby kind of hanging out like two to 5am or three to 6am one that you know, midnight, it's just like the the up the getting up in the morning in the middle of the morning. I'm already getting used to that routine, but as we'll start embracing it, so I was online, and just looking at articles, and this one came up on my Twitter feed, and it's from the Atlantic and I feel very astute. I feel like a very good student, because I personally have just abandoned the amount of hours I used to read in New York City versus Los Angeles ever since I moved to Los Angeles. I don't read so much anymore.

Pallavi Sastry:

Mm hmm. Yeah, I mean, I used to I think I used to be better about catching up on the news at least I mean, there's it's a whole nother conversation about what the news has become. We don't need to get into that in this episode. However, the commuting where you're not driving the car, like you know you're on the train, you're on a bus you're waiting for, you know, your your audition to start or whatever it is, you have a lot more moments of like, you can just sit and like do something else in New York and i and i think i agree with you where you know, you're in your car here. Not right now. You were just trying to,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

like get it. But now I'm awake at two in the morning. And now I have more time to read, because reading makes me hopefully sleepy again. And I am excited that we have decided to dive into an article that was so thought provoking especially for what are friends for. So thank you everyone for joining us today. Please rate and review this show, please check us out on WAFF podcast, you can see how many ways you can keep up with us. Keep in touch with us. And also keep us going by leaving us a review after this episode. And let us know what your thoughts are you can either send us a voicemail?

Pallavi Sastry:

Yes, for sure. And we did receive messages about this article because I think it's a great way for us to just go right into our first segment

Singing:

Instafriends or reality.

Pallavi Sastry:

And as we all know, we choose a Instagram post to start the conversation of this. And we have two points of reference right for this conversation. We had the article. And then Gabrielle you posted February 3, about this article and sort of posed the question that the article poses to your followers and I did the same thing in the DMS. So we'll be going into the answers in the in the responses that we got to it right? Yes, let's go into your post.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yes, I started off with conversation tomorrow, which is today's recording. I will be discussing an article focusing on the loss of our quote unquote weak ties and the toll it's taking on our health. So question, what are your weak ties that you greatly Miss in your routine? Tell me your stories. Comment below or leave me a voice message at 805973 SLAY

Unknown:

yes 805973 SLAY is our wife podcast phone number which you can leave a voicemail or text. And yeah, so

Pallavi Sastry:

what I want to do first is actually define weak ties.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

In the article Amanda mole says American culture does not have many words to describe different levels or types of friendship. But for our purposes, sociology does provide a useful concept, weak ties. The term was coined in 1973 by the Stanford sociologist Mark granovetter. And it comprises acquaintances people you see infrequently, and near strangers with whom you share some familiarity.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yes, so that means the barista at your neighborhood coffee shop, the person at the desk when you go to the gym, the you know if you're a parent, the parking the crossing guards at your child's school or the other parents that you see at pickup, and I really found this to be so profound because just the other day, I was, you know, in the process of moving as I as you know, I've mentioned before, and I do have a neighborhood spot that I would frequent and I knew Most of the staff there, right. And over the last couple of weeks, I've been ordering from that spot a lot. Because we've been packing up, we don't have any of our cooking utensils or anything. So we've been getting food from there. And I remember like catching myself on the phone while I was placing an order trying to guess who I was talking to the staff members. Right, right. And I was like, cuz I yeah, cuz I know all those who those faces are. And I remember like, you know, like, you know, I love all of them in in terms of like the tie that I have to that place. And now that I've moved, I got sad. And that's what I posted on my Instagram in my stories, like I got sad that I didn't really like, say goodbye to them, because I don't even know if half of them have their job there anymore,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

right. And these weak ties, I love that the word weak ties is such a definition is such an oxymoron, that there's so much strength in your psychology for your day to see these people all the time to see this part of your community. The article also states and describes this part of your life as your outer circle. And for me, by the way, we haven't told you guys this is from the Atlantic. And if you would like to follow along with reading this article, as we discuss it, visit patreon.com slash WAFF podcast and see our show notes. There. It's our public page. It's free, if you want to check it out. Or if you want to listen to this, read it and then give us your comments, either on our WAFF podcast, Instagram, or leave us a voice message. We want to keep this conversation going because it's more than 30 minutes for sure. And for me, the outer circle definition. I just have to say like, we're into our third season of what are friends for and I am so comfortably proud that I have finally figured out my inner circle. And I think we brag about that a lot on this show. You and me like look what we did. We figured it out. We're still working on it. We're humble we're gonna keep working at it and like inner circle inner circle inner circle like even Harvey Guillen episode from season two your tiers of friendships and like the third tier at the bottom tier, he talks about like those the people you don't have tons of space for but they're in your life. And I'm like, Yeah, but your top serve your top tier of friends. Those are the best the butter, that's the life. And this article from Amanda Mull from the Atlantic says, nah, you're outer circle is just as important to your mental health. And like thought, like I was like, Oh my gosh, check yourself Ruiz.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, for sure. Because I mean, I think we take for granted all of the the value that those people bring based on and and we just think of it as like, Oh, this is the convenient place I go to eat this is the convenient thing I do. I pick up my dry cleaning, you know, like, and we don't necessarily attach the value of those people to those things in places and services that they provide. Mm hmm. Right. And it's very humbling to think about, especially because we are in this time of really having to show gratitude for the essential workers that are keeping all of these things going. They are number one, yeah, and when we don't get to see them that often and tell them that that we really are grateful for the value they add for to our lives.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Mm hmm. And to like, bring it bring it like further home. Amanda Mull says in the article, many different kinds of relationships are important. And man does not thrive on close friendships alone. And I forgot for the amount of survival that we've all been like white knuckling to get through and to Finish to complete the pandemic like once it's over, we'll just go back to normal and like your, your your social health, to not see for me the boulders gym, where I would work out and rock climb at vertigo boulders in downtown Burbank just the Hello while swiping my car to walk in. I don't know their names, and I might know one and I think it's like it's that kind of friendship where it's like, is it Scott? Or is it Steve? Or is it Shane? Maybe like you're like, what's their name but and you just kind of avoid the name but they're just so friendly. And like every time you ask, you're like I feel bad. I don't remember his name. But he's so cool. Like I miss those people.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah. And you know, she started off Amanda starts off the article talking about how she her thing to do. And she would probably go with friends but she would go to the same bar to watch a game or it's Yeah, to watch sports. And the people that were there to do the same thing even though she wasn't there with them per se like those are the people she said that she was missing and that what made her think about this whole thing. And one of the quotes that I took away from it, which again differentiates what we're talking about the inner circle versus the outer circle stuff. The ties the weak ties, is she says quote, tools like zoom and FaceTime are useful for maintaining closer relationships, but couldn't recreate these Ease of social serendipity or bring back the activities that bound us together.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh,

Pallavi Sastry:

it's so potent, isn't it,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

it's so potent, it's so potent. And it actually reminded me of our WAFF team. Because that's the new relationship. You and I, almost for a year now we've been creating from people we've never met and that are not in our circles, you know, and on our inner circles and Bailey Disler, who was one of our digital content editors, we would spend hours, like editing my, my fondest memory is editing the Holislay special with Broadway princess party. And I was like, we want to make it special. Because it is one, they're special. And like it was like kind of like the most trailer feeling of out of order editing that we had done. And we might have spent like, four, six hours on it together. And so finally, like, in the fourth hour, I was like, Bailey, what do you want to be when you grow up?

Pallavi Sastry:

But that's because you were on a zoom, and you were with to talk to her specifically. So it like created the environment to where you could do, you know, bounce between things, whether it was work or personal or whatever. And it's like, wow, like, you know, this, this whole, like the skills that we were taught to exercise outside of that. It's like, we can't do it with these team members that we love so much, you

Gabrielle Ruiz:

know, like, well, and and yeah, and zoom with the muting and the camera offing and all that as a huge example that I think is extremely relatable to the entire world, that experience has so much control. So I and in the article too. It mentions like the new generation of, of entrepreneurs and workers all around are not getting that water cooler talk. Right? Right, they're not getting that bathroom, by the sink, washing your hands talk and that is a huge, huge impact on people's careers. And I thought about that it even says like, you some of those are the biggest job getting are those third to fourth seperated lower tier outer circle people that can get you another job and I was like, Oh my god, these support generation.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, well, and it also creates like the those the moments where you can create empathy as well, right? It's like, you know, people, you can sort of, like dismiss any sort of visual on zoom. Like meaning, like, let's say, because I know you Gabrielle if you were to come on to zoom and you looked like maybe you weren't having the best day because I know you I could ask you and say Hey, how are you? Are you okay? Today? You know, like and that's because I know you but like if we're on a zoom for work and with people that aren't necessarily like colleagues of ours or friends of ours, it's like we can automatically judge them for any sort of discrepancy that they may be having whether it's like you know, they're having a technical issue or like they they're not having a good day they don't they don't feel well they're under the weather it's like we we don't know them so like they don't have the opportunity to tell us a beat and be like yeah you know i i'm i'm kind of under the weather today or like my kid was just you know, not having a good day right this morning so I'm just not really in the mood you know, those those types of in between things like that it doesn't zoom doesn't really make make space for that for understand. Yes, you know,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I agree. I agree. No, really, Pallavi? I love diving deep into platonic love with you it has really gotten me through this pandemic.

Pallavi Sastry:

Same here Gabrielle and you know, we are happily working so hard to produce this slay content for all of our listeners.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah, that's why I'm so glad we joined Patreon

Pallavi Sastry:

Hey, Patreon and Patreon is the opportunity for our listeners to get exclusive perks from us all while supporting our podcast streams.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

What kind of perks Pallavi

Pallavi Sastry:

Let me tell you about them perks. Okay, our Patreon page has tiers to choose from so you can pick the wolf perks that speak to you, for example, just for joining as a wall friend, patrons automatically get access to the vodcast. Gabrielle tell them what a podcast is.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

It's the video version of our podcast where you can see us and our guests friends interviewed on camera and wait for it. It's only $2 a month.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yes, it gets better. We are also offering the option to join us for a monthly live show and q&a.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh my God, that's amazing. So they can ask us about anything.

Pallavi Sastry:

Not only can they ask us anything, there's even a few tiers where they could come on and win a chance to meet our guests friends to ask them anything.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

slay, slay,

Unknown:

slay. You know, I think what we're most proud of is that 10% of all proceeds from our Patreon page, go to charity. So not only are we focusing on great content for you, we also get the opportunity to give back so you're saying that all you got to do to get these perks is [email protected] slash WAFF podcast. That's W A F F podcast and that directly helps Keep making the show.

Pallavi Sastry:

That's exactly what I'm saying. Because that's what friends are for. Now back to off.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Let's go into one of our comments that we asked on our forums, which was on Instagram. And our voice messages. I would like to read one that was very heartbreaking for me. It's from Reeeee Baaa, it's like Reba with like five to six E's and three A's. Hey, girl, and she responded with her story. There is a waiter, my husband and I have seen for about eight to nine years, he works at a diner we go to on this weekend trip, we would take about five times a year, we if we eat at the diner each night when we go, he was always happy to see us and we would catch up on how we've been the last few months. He was a familiar face and someone we grew to look forward to seeing. I worry about him so much now, I tried to call the diner but the phone system wasn't working. And I didn't try again. Because Is that weird? What message? Do I leave if he isn't there? Or? Oh, this is or this is just a concern? customer. I hope he's okay, I hope I see him again.

Pallavi Sastry:

Oh, that kind of reminds me of what I was trying to do with my neighborhood spotters, like, I'm trying to guess who this is on the phone based on the voice when I'm just so used to seeing their face.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Mm hmm.

Pallavi Sastry:

You know, I totally get this. I totally.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And it's so important to talk about how, how we're so deprived of that part of that angle of our social health that we are desensitizing because zoom FaceTime phone calls, what we have in our socially distance world kind of discriminates to only our inner circle friends. Yeah,

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, it does. And I think there's a lot of compromise that we've had to reach without even realizing that what we're compromising on is, like, relationships that we could be continuing. Because we're just so like you said, concentrated on our inner circles. Let's see what else that we the the types of weak ties is what I asked in my stories, and I got the valet guys at my office, I got the security guards in the buildings where I audition. That's one of the New Yorkers. And then a friend of mine said, you know, the moms I've known since my daughter was in first grade.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And like, you don't have their phone number,

Pallavi Sastry:

right, you don't have their phone number. So

Gabrielle Ruiz:

you don't need it. You don't need it. Because Amanda also says in the article, regular interaction with people outside our inner circle, just makes us feel more like a community a part of something bigger. And the whole a part of something bigger now and 2021 in February is, let's just get through this. You don't have a like, let's just get through this. Let's make as much virtual connection as we can. And that's good. We're I'm not saying like that's not that what we're doing is, is poor in comparison to what we should be doing or we're not doing enough because I know, even like as a pregnant woman, you just moved like, we are doing our best. You know, we are doing our best. It's just I forgot how much I missed. The people that are that frequent outside Philips office that we sometimes walk with Leila our dog. Yeah. And it's just like that older lady that I don't know. And she just waves or she says hi to Leila. Like, what's the dog's name? Like? It's always Layla, you know, like, she never remembers the name, which is fine. And it's just like, Hello, hello, hello. It's hard, isn't it? And then you walk away. And that amount of boost for your brain just can reset you and we don't have that right now.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah. Is it? Is it interesting? Is it weird that I've also thought about, I think it's because I have a young child that doesn't know how to socialize yet? Like, she hasn't been socialized. She was, you know, six months old when we went into quarantine. Right? So and now at 18 months, she's like, fascinated by other people. Right? And like, we just moved, like I said, so. I cannot tell you I felt like I had so much FOMO the other day because my mom said that, you know, they were across the street from our new place. And it's a neighborhood with a lot more small children. And she was like, Yeah, she met a new friend. They have three dogs the daughter's name is Lily and she's almost two so they're gonna be classmates at the elementary school. So I literally like I almost cried because I wasn't there for that moment of like meeting of her meeting somebody in passing you know what I mean? Like

Gabrielle Ruiz:

she's not getting it often.

Pallavi Sastry:

Right? Right. And I wasn't the person to like meet the dad and I wasn't the person to meet the little girl or see the three dogs and you know, I really felt something about it. And this is before I read this this article.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh, wow. Well, I just became it just kind of popped into your memory once Yes. Article again.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yes, it did because it was so it would hit a just happening.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah, well, I'll tell you this Lars Coburn on my Instagram said I always loved that cow makes me miss Burbank almost as much as the people we left behind miss you guys. Now if you look at the photo again, go visit our Patreon account public page. It's me leaning on this downtown Burbank this downtown Burbank, like cow statue. So some of those things like you see, or you remember, just like, Oh, yeah, I don't have that right now, or I don't have that anymore.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, and another old friend of ours, hurraykimmay love her. She wrote omg omg omg. I missed this. But honestly, I started missing missing this. When I moved to rural Oklahoma from New York City. I never saw anyone and started going to the Walmart and buying things I didn't need, just so I could try to have conversation with the checkout person. COVID put a bit of a halt on that. A few minutes later, I'm having even more full conversations with the cat.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Shout out to Sonny the cat. Who is all over her Instagram. Oh my gosh, hurraykimmay thank you so much for also being a part of this conversation. It feels like its own community here on What are friends for. So if you would like to let us know who your weak ties the important the important weak ties in your life. And who your outer circle memory, what your outer circle memories are just you can leave us a voice message. The phone number is 805973 SLAY. And I'm happy to have a follow up episode about this at the end of the show at the end of the season. So we can answer more. As you can even just go to WAFF podcast and says how to reach us and you can pick whatever you want to do. We love discussing friendships, conversations and platonic love, even if it's from an outer circle point of view. Yeah, love this article. So much.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, or if it's just about acquaintances, because clearly those are very important for our social health, as we're, as we're discussing.

Charlie:

Hi there. So regarding the weak ties that I made in my life, there's an email going on, I actually miss two things I miss going to work and actually just seeing a ton of people who don't work with me in my department. So when I worked on my office, I was on an open floor plans, kind of environment. So there are many departments that I regularly did not interact with, for work purposes. But I would see people, often maybe we had some nap time, or bathroom breaks or meal times. So we miss each other in the kitchen or in the hallways. And I built friendships off of those ties. And it was really cool just meeting and getting to know people who did jobs that were next to my job, but not necessarily anything in the world I knew of, for instance, I worked in post production for NBC, but some of my friends at the office worked in UI UX design. And I knew nothing about the world of apps and designing interfaces for users to experience. And I was able to get a glimpse into that world and get to see why other people were passionate about their job. And it helped me come up with solutions for my own work as well. And to think outside of my immediate vicinity. And that is something I really missed. Also, just because they're nice people, and it was cool to meet people that, you know, we're not doing exactly what you did, it always gave us something to talk about other than just saying, Hi, how are you doing? It's like, Can you explain to me this and that. And yeah, that was good. And then I also missed all of the weak ties I have with my church family, I get to see them every Sunday, where I used to where I would just get to like even just be in their vicinity. And of course, we'd always say hi, I hope your week is going well. It's like literally the most basic and basic things. But there's certain there's a certain deeper level to specifically a church environment where we have a spiritual under line, or maybe I should restate that it's like prefer a church environment. We have more of like a spiritual through line in our relationships, which means that we don't always have to just put on a good face and say that we're doing well that we can say, I'm not doing well, or, like I wish this week was better and give like answers that are a little bit more realistic and honest. And in those answers, you would get follow up questions because we know that we are there as a spiritual body

Unknown:

That was a voice message left on our system, because we're cool. Thank you so much, Charlie for sharing your story as well.

Pallavi Sastry:

Mm hmm. And let's do that. Lightning WAFF, shall we?

Singing:

Lightning WAFF

Pallavi Sastry:

So let's change it up to pay homage to this great article that gave us so much to think about. And I have a question for you. Gabrielle, your first lightning WAFF. Question is, do you have none, one or multiple weak ties with friends?

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I have multiple and it's a small amount.

Pallavi Sastry:

How do you keep in touch with those weak ties?

Gabrielle Ruiz:

By not making an effort?

Pallavi Sastry:

What type of a weak tie friend are you? So let's say you go into the gym, and the person behind the counter says hi to you. Do you say hey, do you wave? Do you smile? Do you nod?

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I grin

Pallavi Sastry:

No, we can't. Nobody tell that we're grading right now.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I know that was a Macy's Macy's triple 15 Instagram comments. She was like I just miss smiling to people knowing that I'm smiling at them. I wish they knew because now you have to just like do a smile. You know, you just got to do eyebrows up and like squint your eyes and I don't even I don't even move my mouth anymore. I just do like the whole like eyebrow thing. I'm a pre pandemic. I am a gardener and I I usually just say it's hot outside or it's so cold outside and then I keep going

Pallavi Sastry:

talk about the weather and you know when we are allowed to see people more often. What do you what would you like to do better?

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I need to remember Scott Seth or Stephens name I need to know his name at vertical boulders. I need to let you finish the question because I already knew the answer Yeah, I can do better as a weak tie friend know his freaking name. Okay, your turn follow me here we go. Do you have none one or multiple weak tie friends?

Pallavi Sastry:

I say I have many

Gabrielle Ruiz:

How do you keep in touch

Pallavi Sastry:

I call before I show up? If they're if it's something that I can still take advantage of like the cafe or the dry cleaners outside of that. I I left a good review for somebody the other day.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

That's that's how you keep in touch. That's a good one. What kind of Wi Fi friend are you?

Pallavi Sastry:

I am also a printer pre pandemic but now I try and remember that they can't see that and I wave

Gabrielle Ruiz:

and what would you like to do better as a weak tie friend?

Pallavi Sastry:

I would actually like to be better about saying thank you to them like you know just like acknowledging what they're doing more openly not that I don't but like I just want to be more intentional about it instead of just like brushing past the thank you and then that whole leaving a review thing I think I'm going to do it more often because I see how much it means to them

Gabrielle Ruiz:

and then Pallavi finally what are weak tie friends for

Pallavi Sastry:

Weak tie friends are to brighten your day to add value to your life and to remind you that it takes a village okay Gabrielle What are weak tie friends for

Gabrielle Ruiz:

weak tie friends are to remind you how important everybody in your life is that's it supposed to be lightning off I keep going and going about this article Amanda well I'm so I'm so obsessed with you. And this article I I already emailed her and I was like just you know, I love this article. We're talking about it like I'm NPR or something. And we'd love to get a quote and blah blah. So everybody go thank her on the Atlantic and sent her an email her emails there and tell her how much he loved her. But more importantly, tell us what you thought about this conversation. You can send us a voice message you can tweet to us, you can dm us, you can talk to us at WAFF podcast.com Yes, all

Unknown:

of the ways are there. And we look forward to playing those voicemails in more of our episodes as the season progresses. And with that, we will see all of you outer circle weak tie friends next week.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

We love you weak ties. Bye

Pallavi Sastry:

bye

Gabrielle Ruiz:

1234

Pallavi Sastry:

This episode was produced by Team acceses productions and fasten our supervising producer is Philip Pisanchyn our consulting producers are

Unknown:

kathlyn Cho and Rose hardwood. Head of production and marketing is Eva Ratcliffe digital content director is Suzy Cabello. Our production assistants are Daniela Hariavega Solaire Olsen and Megann Billedo. Our podcast artwork is created by our Ashrya Shucase original music is by Joey Sherman, and special things to irresistible force publicity Bailey Disler and Hari Savitala.

Pallavi Sastry:

Please remember to subscribe rate and review this podcast wherever you're listening to it now this helps the show's visibility and helps us keep making it for you.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And find us on all the socials Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and tick tock at WAFF podcast. That's W A F F podcast to buy links to our exclusive vodcast live shows, shop merge or even text us visit WAFF podcast.com.

Pallavi Sastry:

And we truly appreciate you all checking in with us online. But you know that friend that you've been like, Oh, I really haven't checked in with them in a while. Go do that.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah. Go do that. Now.