What Are Friends For

Faith and Friends

March 30, 2021 Gabrielle Ruiz & Pallavi Sastry Season 3 Episode 10
What Are Friends For
Faith and Friends
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What Are Friends For
Faith and Friends
Mar 30, 2021 Season 3 Episode 10
Gabrielle Ruiz & Pallavi Sastry

On this week's episode, Pallavi and Gabrielle open up to each other about their experiences with religion growing up and accepting and celebrating one another's differences in faith as adults. Even best friends have more to learn about each other; the two open up about the tenets of Hinduism and Christianity and how these beliefs are tied to their identities.

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Show Notes Transcript

On this week's episode, Pallavi and Gabrielle open up to each other about their experiences with religion growing up and accepting and celebrating one another's differences in faith as adults. Even best friends have more to learn about each other; the two open up about the tenets of Hinduism and Christianity and how these beliefs are tied to their identities.

Get free delivery on your first grocery order of $35 or more at instacart.oloiyb.net/WAFF  

Follow us everywhere @waffpodcast

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/waffpodcast)

Gabrielle Ruiz:

No really, What are friends for? I'm Gabrielle Ruiz.

Pallavi Sastry:

Hello. And I'm Gabrielle's best friend Pallavi Sastry, that was a very NPR of you.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh my gosh, thank you. That's what all I've been listening to, you know, with COVID cases getting better in Los Angeles. It's February 26. When we're recording this. There's a GIF that CBS studios made of crazy ex girlfriend where Rachel Bloom is kissing my hand. It's like first moments of Valencia and Rebecca Bunch, encounter, and it says, like, what I'm going to be like, when I'm back and lost all my social skills, like, right, it's just like, how are we going to be? If we return to like, the past world, like, I don't even think it's gonna be like, normal. Everyone's like, when we get back to normal, like, it's never gonna be the same. The same, right?

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, I've caught myself like, you know, because when we moved, I was making up to two or three tip trips a day to Home Depot. And like, usually, I'm like, just very pleasant. And I try and like smile at people. But you know, because I was like, scared of exposure. And I was double masked, you know, and like, clearly I'm good to go when I'm double masked and I'm not talking to anybody, but like,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And you have the antibodies

Pallavi Sastry:

Right. And but I wouldn't even look at people. And that's what I caught myself. Like, I'm not even looking at people anymore.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Or, like, I don't even smile at them because they don't know I'm smiling anyway. So distance Exactly. And no social skills anymore. But I mean, let's talk about worse social skills. I am having like a volleyball Wilson moment at home right now. Okay? Like Castaway the movie. Okay? So it's really fun this season that you and I can merge and find a meeting of the mom Enos. Yeah, likewise, I'm pregnant and you have a baby of a young baby. So like, things are like, we were driving in the car today. And I finally saw a stroller and I finally under looked at the brand for the first time, I was like, Oh, that's a baby. You know, like, I've seen strollers all my life. I've used strollers as a babysitter all of my adulthood. I've never actually ever have even like, realized there was a brand on it until you actually care about it. Right. So with that I've been taking really deep rabbit hole dives into mommy blogs on YouTube.

Pallavi Sastry:

Welcome. Welcome. Welcome. Welcome.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

So there's this one mom, Alliy Scott. Hey, girl, I hope you're listening to this n What are friends for thank y u so much for subscribing to y channel. And I have to say lik , She's so chill, and type , which is not me, I'm just ki d of Type A and intense but she s like in like Colorado r something and literally recor s her entire da

Pallavi Sastry:

Wow.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And there are videos where they're that long, but there's also videos of like, what I wish I had known to pack in my hospital bag, or what I wish or what I learned in my first kid that I'm not gonna do it. My second kid also like, what they call halls, you know like the product halls. And they they like talk about all these product things. And they just like tell you and they're like links to the link in the descriptions underneath me. Make sure to subscribe, hit the bell, blah, blah, blah. And these ladies have got it down. Okay, they have got it to a professional science. And they are making so much money or at least that's what it looks like that I am. I'm okay. If my future entails me retiring from acting all entirely. And being a YouTube mommy blog. Right?

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah. And I and but you've also been like setting up the shop at the church, right? Like the the church building becomes your warehouse of sorts. I mean, that's where I'm dropping off all your shit. So

Gabrielle Ruiz:

hopefully nobody the church really listens to this podcast. So they don't know that I'm taking up space and not not paying for red, making a baby department store and one of the closets in here.

Pallavi Sastry:

I just never knew that you could use a church that way. Maybe I should try that.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Let's go into our segment

Singing:

Instafriends or Reality Yeah.

Pallavi Sastry:

Okay, so that was a very that I did that very intentionally because it segue into our answer friends for today is I wanted to bring up my post from August 6 2019, which feels like a bajillion years ago now. But in fact, it was just over 18 months ago. Because you and Philip were the only two friends that we invited to Meenakshi my daughter's namings. ceremony. The Hindu naming ceremony which the traditional word is called Namkaran. Name means name. And, yeah, it was. And I have to tell you that it was act. And I told you, I was going to save this for the recording. I actually did think twice about inviting you guys. Because I was like, oh, who are the closest in LA? Who are our closest proximity slash closest friends, who are Indian, who are Hindu, who we could invite over. And then we were like, why am I actually thinking that way? Like, maybe I should just like, let that go. And like, let that insecurity go, and just invite my, our two best friends. You don't I mean, so I want you to know that like, that was like a big step for me.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

What, what insecurity specifically, were you letting go?

Pallavi Sastry:

Well, here's the thing. Um, I think in light, and I'm just gonna tangentially mentioned this, even though it requires so much more attention. But like, when you're when you're the child of immigrants, especially Asian immigrants in this country, you are perpetually made to feel like a foreigner. Because there's nothing mainstream American about you on paper. Right? Like, a lot. You know, America is built on Christianity. And like, you know, that we're, it's Oh, yeah. And white people. And like, you know, it's just, I think, for me, I just default to who would get this and not asking me too many questions. And you know what I mean, like, because it always felt like I was being grilled about something. And even though like, religion, to me is not necessarily like something I think about every single day, but it does guide the way I live. And it was guided in the way I was raised. So religion was never like a topic of discussion. And I still didn't want it to be even if I was engaging in religious activities, quote, does that make sense?

Gabrielle Ruiz:

It does make sense, it makes sense that you have titled you have categorized it as an insecurity. I was just curious on why that word versus like something you were protecting? Or

Pallavi Sastry:

maybe it's both, you know, because I think insecurity you do protect those rights. So like, maybe I agree with you, there's, there's a level of protecting there as well.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah, yeah, it was very nice to hear that I don't press my religion on you. I'm a Christian. I'm a, I'm a born again, Christian, that those kind. I grew up, you know, running around the church, live God loud rock and roll music. And it was just an every twice a week. thing, for me was part of my schedule. It was a commitment, you don't work, you don't substitute anything for it. And then I walked, I walked away from it, the traditional like commitment, and I needed to find it on my own. And it's when you and I became friends, I really wasn't active as a Christian. I was really committed to the religion of work, and found health and wellness, and really created the for the first time, I mean, so funny, like I'm yoga still doesn't really keep me going back to class, like ballet keeps me going back to class. That's my yoga. And Yoga is very spiritual. And I have so many friends that consider that a beautiful part of their spirituality, and religion. And I remember in New York, having roommates that were Yogi's, or having having really best friends and good friends that were a part of that culture, and I would be able to have really great conversations with them. Regarding both of our religions, both of our faiths, both of our ground work, I was able to quote Bible scriptures, and they would be like, exactly, that also makes sense. So I remember for the first time, versus the way I grew up, which is like Christianity is the only way or at least that's how I heard it as a kid, or at least the right fear was, in some way and, you know, instilled upon me that to not falter, to not steer to not think of any other thing. It was so wonderful back in my upper like, 20s that I was able to have, like, an open door conversation about it. And we had never done that you and me. And so when you invited me to Meenakshi's ceremony, we were honored. I mean, so honored to be considered the godparents, you know, in that way, like, you know, I think a god parents maybe is a more Christian thing, but it is, it is, and it's and I say it that way because it's so normal for America to have that title that doesn't really do anything. And I I just remember feeling so honored. I was so honored to like not feel like I had to know what it was. I had to do anything or had expectations of, you know, performing for you guys or anything like that. And it was it was so lovely.

Pallavi Sastry:

Well, good. I'm glad to hear that because you know, what you were describing as your perception of growing up Christian or Christianity is also what my perception of it was. Right? It's like God fearing God right now. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. And so like, I would also be, like, on edge. And I remember like being tricked into like, going to Wednesday Bible studies by a couple peoplee, like, over the years, and I would like I thought I was just, Hey, you know, like, I thought I was making a friend. And then we I ended up at like, the Mormon church. And I'm just like, what is happening right now, and even happened to me in college, I remember a friend of mine said that we were it was my freshman year. And she said, Oh, we just go over to so and so's house to hang out. And like for community, it's been I've found some really good commute in some great friendships with these girls. And I'm like, Oh, cool. Great.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Now, let us pray.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, exactly. At one point, they handed me a piece of paper with lyrics on it and say, do you want to follow along? And I was like, What is happening?

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And at that age, you're like, Okay, you don't want to make a ruckus at all. Yeah, you're not fluffing any feathers.

Pallavi Sastry:

Right? So and, and I knew when we met, you know, we were both in college or you were finishing up and I actually did know that about you that Christianity was a part of your life. And so it was part of the reason why I felt like oh, then maybe she may not want to get too close to me.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Really? We've never talked about this before.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, I mean, I'm, it's just based on my history, like, historically, that's when that's what's been presented. You know, it's just yeah, and maybe it's the part of the country we're both from and where we went to school and you know, all that stuff that like just played into this like exclusiveness

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Well, speaking of exclusive exclusivity is lack of exposure, lack of culture of other cultures. That is one positive thing from when we were growing up the kids have now maybe too much is in the palm of their hand they can see the world literally see the world and as parents me as a future parent, you know, that's pretty frightening. But at the same time you know that maybe that's why not just my parents but maybe the church was fear based you know, to make you feel like to focus and to keep things close and keep your you know, your spiritual friends closer is as a strength thing and i don't know i i hope as as a parent that we can share our religion to our kids and let them also respect and love other ones, whichever they choose. It's tough. No, really, Pallavi? I love diving deep into platonic love with you. It has really gotten me through this pandemic.

Pallavi Sastry:

Same here Gabrielle and you know, we are happily working so hard to produce this slay content for all of our listeners.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah, that's why I'm so glad we joined Patreon.

Pallavi Sastry:

Hey, Patreon, and Patreon is the opportunity for our listeners to get exclusive perks from us all while supporting our podcast dreams.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

What kind of perks Pallavi?

Pallavi Sastry:

let me tell you about them perks. Okay, our Patreon page has tears to choose from. So you can pick the WAFF perks that speak to you, for example, just for joining as a WAFF friend, patrons automatically get access to the vodcast. Gabrielle tell them what a vodcast is.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

It's the video version of our podcast where you can see us and our guests friends interviewed on camera and wait for it. It's only $2 a month.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yes, it gets better. We are also offering the option to join us for a monthly WAFF live show and q&a.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh my God, that's amazing. So they can ask us about anything.

Pallavi Sastry:

Not only can they ask us anything, there's even a few tiers where they could come on and win a chance to meet our guest friends to ask them anything.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Slay slay slay you know, I think what we're most proud of is that 10% of all proceeds from our Patreon page, go to charity. So not only are we focusing on great content for you, we also get the opportunity to give back.

Pallavi Sastry:

So you're saying that all you got to do to get these perks is [email protected]/waffpodcastpodcast. That's W A F F podcast and that directly helps us keep making the show.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

That's exactly what I'm saying.

Pallavi Sastry:

Because that's what friends are for. Now back to off. Yeah, and you know, I'm curious to know if like, Is it because you don't? You've never recruited me to go to your church, which I appreciate you came

Gabrielle Ruiz:

to our Christmas concert like I was like, Wow,

Pallavi Sastry:

did you guys buy that? Were you surprised by that?

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yes. Did we invite you?

Pallavi Sastry:

So you told us about it? And I want to say you might have given us the invite on the group texts we have with the with

Gabrielle Ruiz:

with our other if anybody wants Christmas cheer kind of invite like, yeah, yeah. And then it's also a passion projects like, right. It's a passion project for Philip and me. My husband Philip is the music minister at a church by it stumbled upon us when we moved here. That and then I found out then that he always had a passion in ministry. I was like, Oh, good to know, we were married for six months. God, I just remember like, really, Lord, do you really want me to direct this Christmas concert? Like, they've never done it before. And it takes a lot of work. And I care a lot about music. Especially if it's Christian, you know, and if I'm going to do this, I'm going to do it well. And we've been doing it now for four years. And me as like the director of Philip producing it. And we did go to a group text everybody like, hey, if anybody wants some Christmas cheer, it's it's, you know, it's it's more Advent, more Nativity music, not Santa Claus. But we would love your support. And if you can make it again, like, I just think we kept we kept it light. without passing you a Bible. That's Yeah, gift.

Pallavi Sastry:

You know, and I definitely like that. It was the first time that I went without the discomfort attached to it. And I, but also at the same time, I was like, I can still support my friends in this thing that they're passionate about, because it's a big part of their life. And if if there are lyrics that show up on the screen that I don't understand, or that doesn't make sense to me, I'll just listen and appreciate instead of feeling like because I wasn't cornered into that situation, radio chose,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

you chose Go ahead.

Pallavi Sastry:

I said, I chose to go. So it's not me being cornered.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I know. But like, I started every one of those concerts walking up to the stage as the conductor and I say, Good evening, and everyone's like, good evening is like, please stand and sing with us.

Pallavi Sastry:

I stood, but there are times I was like, I don't know this song.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

You don't know come all ye faithful?

Pallavi Sastry:

See, and that's the thing. Gabrielle right, Carol, that I know. But that's the thing. Gabrielle right. Like, you assume that I know these things, because that is how I was, like, I grew up here feeling like I had to like I had to learn all of these things, even though they did not mean what they mean to you and date other people.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

But I'll tell you this, like growing up with Oh, come all ye faithful. Maybe even today, it's still more A Christmas Carol than a worship song.

Pallavi Sastry:

Right? But I'm saying even Christmas as a whole we've embraced it as a family as a as an immigrant culture, like we have, we have embraced that holiday for the sake of survival at times.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Sure.

Pallavi Sastry:

Right. You know, and like, it's for us, we will always choose to look at it as a wonderful gathering of our people and our friends and our loved ones and whatnot and take take the values that we feel like mean something to us, but that's the thing that's that's what I'm trying to hit home is like, the reason why I've never felt like I could be really close friends with a Christian is that they don't understand that I was forced into try having to understand what it is and having to learn all those lyrics and having to, you know, not ask too many questions because like, because it's like, oh, what do you mean you don't understand that you don't know the story of three kings? Like I don't know that story.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I just learned it. I honestly

Pallavi Sastry:

But do you know what I'm saying like it's it's

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I'm not trying to I'm not trying to lighten what you're saying. I'm so sorry. Yeah, cuz I went to elementary schools that were Pentecostal a Christian so they really do write that in, you know, into the subject matter of like morning singing along. I my question still stands like, how did you feel about standing up and singing without knowing that was gonna happen?

Pallavi Sastry:

Well, here's the thing about the sing the singing specifically, is that I am a singer. And that is another connection to my spirituality and to God. So I can respect that for that and how that makes me feel I chose not to get caught up in the actual scripture or like if it made you know what I mean. Like, I guess that was that was a an activity I could partake in that I understood the value of in my own life.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Okay, because for that's good to hear, because, as the director of these Christmas concerts, Glendale church, you can find us online. On Instagram, it was to get it was to set a mood of like, Oh, it's Christmas time. And so like I always choose the theme as a carol, due to the American culture and the familiarity in every holiday movie, not not Christian based or Christian based or not. Right, that you at least maybe have heard. Heard it and a tinkle like a you know, a twinkly version, you know, behind the Christmas tree or anything like that. So I always try to set the mood of like, Oh, this is going to be something that I know. So that's just very interesting. Like for someone that isn't a Christian is not going to try to convert Christianity didn't feel like they were being converted, or being like,

Pallavi Sastry:

Well, it's because I've navigated these feelings for what, 30 something years now. So I think I'm past the part in my life where I'm going to resent somebody for the gesture, you know, I'm past that I'm past that. So like, you know, and that's why it means so much to me. Now. When I say things like, hey, it's it's the Wally and I really want to say something about it on our on our social media, and I really want to share more about it. And you know, we're having my kid watch a Disney Jr. animated show all about the Wally is like, I when I saw it, and because I went to the early screening of that show, and like, that kind of stuff is, like, monumental for me. Do you know what I mean? Because it's like somebody's saying that it's okay for for me to be there. I choose not to default to resentment about this stuff.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I don't feel like you sound that way. Yeah, well, that's good. And if you did, it's not now.

Pallavi Sastry:

Right? Um, and there are moments where like, I might be triggered to be like, Well, no, I don't actually want to talk about that. Because I've been talking about it my whole life. And I didn't want to, you know, it's like I think now I'm okay with like talking about, like, even Hinduism in bouts, because I think it's, I think I live my life in a way that if I were to explain it to you, and maybe you know, that might be a cool thing to do right now is like, you know, if I were to tell you about like the pillars, like some of the pillars of Hinduism, it might actually make me make more sense to you. Do you mean? Yeah, so like, you know, like, a fundamental principle, honestly, is that our actions and thoughts directly determine our current and our future lives. So it's very, we think, before we speak, we, we, and when I don't do that, when I don't think before I speak, I will, like the karma of that will come back to me, and I do take it very, very, very seriously. Like, if I, if I make a mistake, it weighs on me for a long time, because I'm trying to figure out how to make sure that whatever I the misstep I made is being addressed and that I am trying to write it if it's with another person, or, you know, whatever it is, it's like, I have to send the good energy back out so that I can clear that away from my conscience and my soul so that I can be reborn again. I love so that's why I don't really get angry all that much. And when I do, it's, it's more passionate. I get try to get passionate about things. You know, and I don't like to yell at people. I don't. I don't think when somebody is already like, feeling bad. somebody hurts my feelings. And I know they already feel bad about it. I will almost never try and like stay there. Yeah, I won't say they're like they don't they don't need that. You know, they mean like that is not for me to to decide how much to punish them. They're already punished. They're punishing themselves.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, yeah. Same lines is forgiven forgot.

Pallavi Sastry:

Right. Right. So I don't know if that makes me make sense a little more. But

Gabrielle Ruiz:

But I want you to I want you to not have to say that at the end. Go on next one,

Pallavi Sastry:

then Dharma is basically like, you know, you're you're trying to achieve this. So

Gabrielle Ruiz:

what we talked about was karma.

Pallavi Sastry:

Well, no, the karma is the thing coming back the punishment coming to you,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

cuz I would consider that like a pretty well known phrase yet is that, that maybe somebody doesn't even know it's Hindu. You're just like, Oh, Karma should know should know. But not

Pallavi Sastry:

right. Like your sole salvation is like reaching dharma. And so like, that's when you don't have to be reincarnated anymore. So like in every in every iteration of your life, like you're just trying to do better each time. I think for me like that comes in the form of continuing to learn going out of my way to fix a problem like you know, go and I don't even want to think of it as out of my way like I just I don't like to let things lie and assume that somebody is going to feel the way that I feel there's like a couple more you know, like and you know, I also had to do a little bit of homework just to make sure I was getting this right but like, you know, our thighs, another one which is like, kind of your, your ability, like what you do with your time like you know what you choose to do with your time in the in that life and like your achievement and your your effort towards things and all that stuff. Which, you know, I don't have to put a label on it, but I'm definitely a go getter and I'm definitely a doer. So that's just part of, I think it's like, you know, don't wait for somebody to ask you to do something. Just do. You know,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I don't think there's a Bible verse that says exactly that.

Pallavi Sastry:

Again, I don't think I'm being textbook here. And you know, watch us get like comments in the comment section. So wrong, she's wrong about that.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

When religion is spoken of, there is no dead end, there is no, you, you interpreting it the way you do, and trying to live it in your friendships, specifically, we're going to talk about in our friendship podcast, to be corrected or to be wrong. is not punishment. It's not, it's not insulting, because we are all just trying to be a higher self. And I just, I'm so happy that, again, like we have exposure, we are living in different places that are not so you know, honed in on to one exact way of living with one exact way of culture with one exact way of face. You know, like we don't have I mean, I feel like with all the movements, especially during pandemia, like we have change upon us, and it's up to us to continue pushing through conversations like this on WAFF.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, for sure. Yeah. I mean, this is the the least uncomfortable I have been in a, in a conversation about religion, whether it's mine or Christianity or whatever it is, you know,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

to hear that my friendship, my platonic love, that's, you doesn't find that as a barrier. And you're not trying to marry me, but like, as a barrier, you know, to be like, keep me at some length. Yeah, it's very rewarding for me, because I've, I've never, I've tried, I've tried to not do that with my friendships. And it's, it's been wonderful. Because I want my kids to grow up with a friend that's Hindu with shishi. You know, I want my kids to be good friends Oh, she she and be able to share the beauty and the colors and the dynamics and, and then ask me questions about and I'll say this as much as I know, but go ask Pallavi.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, and like, thankfully, we're at a time where your kids could watch you know, Mira, Royal detective on Disney Jr. and enjoy it for what it is, you know, I mean, like, you know, because, essentially, that's what we did, you know, like we I found myself, you know, I tried to find myself represented in, in all of those cartoons that were basically Christianity, you know, because that's what I had.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

That's all.

Pallavi Sastry:

That's all my that's all I had.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

We have a wonderful time helping our church out. And we're so grateful that you felt comfortable to support us and not come find out what Christianity is all about. Because that's what Christmas should be. I think, because I'm a Christian, my goal because this is the holiday, versus it being the secular like buying gifts and doing all these, you know, like all these other expectations, like to love. It's just to love and to celebrate a big moment in our history, that to us change the world and what we believe was groundbreaking, literally breaking the ground, and to have a lovely time with anyone that wants to join us. So that's what I try to do with those Christmas concerts that you came to. And then there's like a little bizarre that Brady's bakery was that that's totally true.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yes, I had a lovely time and some cookies, saying that they sing the songs I knew. And then I stuffed my face. Because like I came to that. Last time I came to that concert, I was what like, I think I was like 12 weeks pregnant.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And then we had a rap, it was so cute. Yeah. Before we move on to our final segment, I love you very much.

Pallavi Sastry:

I love you too.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And I feel very honored that you brought up this topic to want to talk about

Pallavi Sastry:

Mm hmm. Yes, it was time. I'm glad to do it. I wrote these questions, just to go off of our topic at hand. And so I want to ask you, Gabrielle, what does it mean to you to be Christian?

Gabrielle Ruiz:

to love one another, and hold each other accountable? for just that specific wording in that order? Pallavi? What does it mean to you to be Hindu?

Pallavi Sastry:

To be accepting, forgiving and tolerant to the nth degree of all humans and their human experience? What have you learned about me as a friend during this conversation about faith?

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I've learned when it comes to you as a friend, that you feel powerful enough that you feel empowered enough, and you can be honest with me to shine light on the work that I need to do because when I said but you don't know come and faithful you're like That's it. That's it right there. And that's the that's the work I have to do when it comes to acknowledging How convenient my faith is and America versus how inconvenient yours is. And so finally, what have you learned about me as a friend during this conversation about faith?

Pallavi Sastry:

I learned that the Christian faith for you and for Philip is a work in progress. Like there's always there's always room for more interpretation. And I'm glad to hear that most that's that's why I think I'm comfortable talking about this with you because it wasn't just about it's written in the book and so it is, so don't ask me questions.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah. put out a break. Thank you for writing. Thank you for subscribing. Thank you for loving what our friends for let us know about your dynamics with your religious platonic loves. What do you guys not talk about religion? Do you talk about religion? Has it been uncomfortable? Do you have any sort of inkling to like want to talk about it or it has has a friendship ended for you? Because you had this conversation? spill the religious friendship team we want to know you can DMS text us comment and also just check out WAFFpodcast.com and all the ways on there.

Pallavi Sastry:

And we'll see you soon on another episode of what are friends for next week. 1234 This episode was produced by Team access productions and Fast Nickel Inc. Our supervising producer is Philip Pisanchyn.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Our consulting producers are Kathleen Choe and Rose Harwood lead production

Pallavi Sastry:

assistant is Anna Dankaker digital content director is Susi Cabello. Our production assistants are Daniela Heredie Vega, Solair Olsen, and Megann Billedo.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Our podcast artwork is created by Aishwarya Sukesh original music by Joie Sherman and special thanks to irresistible force publicity and Hari Savitala

Pallavi Sastry:

please remember to subscribe rate and review this podcast wherever you're listening. Now, this helps our show's visibility and helps us keep making it for you.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And find us on all the socials Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and tik tok at waffpodcast. That's W A F F podcast to find links to our exclusive podcasts, live shows shop merch, even text us visit waffpodcast.com.

Pallavi Sastry:

We truly appreciate you all checking in with us online. We know that friend that you've been like, ah, I really haven't checked in with them in a while. Go do that.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah. Go do that. Now.