What Are Friends For

Amanda LaCount: Friends Breaking the Stereotype

April 20, 2021 Gabrielle Ruiz & Pallavi Sastry Season 3 Episode 13
What Are Friends For
Amanda LaCount: Friends Breaking the Stereotype
Chapters
What Are Friends For
Amanda LaCount: Friends Breaking the Stereotype
Apr 20, 2021 Season 3 Episode 13
Gabrielle Ruiz & Pallavi Sastry

Pallavi and Gabrielle speak with professional dancer, choreographer, singer, model, and body positivity activist - Amanda LaCount - about friendship, dance, and the challenge of staying connected to both in a virtual world. They discuss loving the body you are in; after all, it is a vessel for your slay self to shine through!

Get 10% off your HydroJug order with code WAFF10https://www.thehydrojug.com/discount/FRIENDS

Follow us everywhere @waffpodcast

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/waffpodcast)

Show Notes Transcript

Pallavi and Gabrielle speak with professional dancer, choreographer, singer, model, and body positivity activist - Amanda LaCount - about friendship, dance, and the challenge of staying connected to both in a virtual world. They discuss loving the body you are in; after all, it is a vessel for your slay self to shine through!

Get 10% off your HydroJug order with code WAFF10https://www.thehydrojug.com/discount/FRIENDS

Follow us everywhere @waffpodcast

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/waffpodcast)

Pallavi Sastry:

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Gabrielle Ruiz:

Why Thank you Pallavi and contrary to popular belief, it's not just from my pregnancy.

Pallavi Sastry:

Well tell me your secret.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

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Pallavi Sastry:

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Gabrielle Ruiz:

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Pallavi Sastry:

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Gabrielle Ruiz:

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Pallavi Sastry:

Hydrojug is so slay that we'd like to say that friends are for keeping each other hydrated. So waff fam head on over to thehydrojug.com and use the promo code WAFF10 at checkout so you can get 10% off your very own hydrojug.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Once again that's W A F F 10 at checkout for 10% off your very own super stylish slay hydrojug enjoy friends and don't forget with hydrojug there is nothing between you and crushing a gallon of water per day.

Pallavi Sastry:

Now back to WAFF.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

No really what our friends for friends are for god. a dancer. a dancer who dances hello I'm Gabrielle Ruiz I'm done now Pallavi

Pallavi Sastry:

and I'm Gabrielle's best friend Pallavi Sastry give me somebody to dance.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh, you know, having this guest friend on today reminds me that I was a dancer on Broadway. I forget. I forget all the time. Like it's been a long time when I threw those like pointe shoes over my shoulder and then on crazy ex girlfriend, they're like, can you do ballet and pointing and I was like, Say what? And then I went back to class. I had gotten my ass back in class, and I was like, Okay, I, I could do this. I've been doing this for 20 bajillion years. And then doing a double pirouette after the age of 30 on pointe shoes is very different than when you were like eighteen.

Pallavi Sastry:

And also reminds me that we were probably around this guest's age when you and I met on the stage.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Was it stick to the status quo?

Pallavi Sastry:

Yep, exactly.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

We bring him all the time.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, during the dance break. When I dislocated my knee, he had to carry me off. one of my favorite stories

Gabrielle Ruiz:

out of love out of pride and love just like we were at war. Welcome to the show, everyone. We're so excited. You're here at what our friends for. Thank you for rating and reviewing our show. You can visit waff shop for some merch honies. Okay, we love that you are supporting us. We appreciate it. And we also have a Patreon like there's so many ways you can support us but also friend Yeah, be our friend. But there are also other ways that you can just support us that our free like free 99 so

Pallavi Sastry:

like rate reviewing, like looking at the waff blog on the public page on Patreon that's free 99 you guys follow me

Gabrielle Ruiz:

on Instagram, all the things,

Pallavi Sastry:

all the things and so let's get to it. Gabrielle let's have her so excited about this get excited about art we have today we have a professional dancer, choreographer, actress, singer model and body positivity activist with her own hashtag that she created. Okay, hashtag breaking the stereotype. Please welcome Miss Amanda LaCount.

Amanda LaCount:

Yay. Hello.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Hey, girl.

Pallavi Sastry:

So lovely to have you here.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh my gosh,

Amanda LaCount:

I almost said you too but that doesn't make sense. But you get the vibe I was going for.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Well, in your zoom. You're so excited. We're at your house in your zoom.

Amanda LaCount:

Oh, yeah. So welcome to my home.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh, well. I mean, I've always felt like your social media presence has been so homey and welcoming. So being a fan of you from the social needs. Also from dancer dancer. It's just like I mean, I think I fell upon your Instagram by trend first like something that I was just like kind of grazing on Instagram. And I was like, Yeah, she better werk I was like she is so good.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, that's honestly like the overarching like every time you post something you She and I because we talk every day because we produce a show together. But like she was like, did you see that video that Amanda LaCount did already see. And we're just such fans of your artistry, like you are such a great dancer.

Amanda LaCount:

Thank you so much.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

When did you start dancing?

Amanda LaCount:

I started when I was two. So I've been doing it forever. And I first got started because I come from a family of seven. So a very large family. And I'm the baby. And so whenever my sister

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh you're the baby.

Amanda LaCount:

Yep

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I have so much to unload after that. Go ahead. Yeah.

Amanda LaCount:

So my two older sisters were in dance when I was really little. And I'd have to be at the studio a lot because my mom was a single parent. And I would just always be dancing up and down and pop into the music and staring through the window. And I think she could just tell that I wanted to be in there really badly. So she put me in dance classes. And from there.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

The rest is history.

Amanda LaCount:

Yep.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh my gosh, what is your favorite? like traditional style?

Pallavi Sastry:

Oh, um,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

ballet tap dance?

Amanda LaCount:

Yeah, jazz. I really enjoy jazz. Honestly, it's probably my second favorite besides hip hop. And that's just because I love high energy, like performance based stuff. So jazz is pretty similar to hip hop in that sense, but also very different. But yeah, I love jazz.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh,

Pallavi Sastry:

yeah. I mean, you're, you're the youngest of seven. So was that something and we've talked we've touched on a very lightly on the shows like sibling friendship is like a very specific dynamic, right? So like, with with you being a dancer, and all of that. Did Was that something you connected with your siblings on is that would you say that that's, that's true for you?

Amanda LaCount:

I would say probably that's not what I connect like that we don't connect. Because of that. Both my sisters stopped dancing A few years after I started, you know, they didn't seem to be super passionate about it. So one's a doctor now and one's a cheerleading coach. And so we don't really bond over a dance, but they are really supportive. And it's funny, because whenever I do like a campaign with Nike, or I do a video with Lady Gaga, they're like, Oh, my gosh, you're so cool. Like, I tell all my friends, like my sister was in that. But then like, they don't care about dance. Like, besides that, they just think it's cool that I get to work with like celebrity

Gabrielle Ruiz:

They're like, you're right. They're like your arabesque was so great. They're like, they don't say that.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, they're proud. They're proud.

Amanda LaCount:

They are they're very supportive

Singing:

Instafriends or Reality

Pallavi Sastry:

On January 13 2021, you posted a video from class, and you wrote missing these classes and this energy so much. And it's a BRIAN FRIEDMAN piece, I think, yes, it is.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

For our Patreon subscribers. I mean, Amanda's doing, like a full on babcom, right? She's like, Oh, yes, I remember that.

Amanda LaCount:

I love that video. And I love Brian, so much like where I prefer. And I mean, the kid the caption, it does sound a little cheesy, but it's so true. You know, obviously, we're dealing with COVID and quarantine. So we haven't been able to go to dance classes much. And there's a few outside classes I take and teach every once in a while. But I was just really missing the the energy and the community atmosphere. And I didn't realize how much I kind of need that and rely on that to like, keep my eye on you this at a high level.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yes.

Amanda LaCount:

So I really do miss class. And that one is honestly one of my favorites to date probably of classes I've ever done. And I just wish I could go back to that day and relive it before all this craziness happened.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, How long ago? Was that video that before you posted it? Yeah,

Amanda LaCount:

I believe it was winter. 2019. November, December ish.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Do you remember those days like, everyone's like doing the whole warm ups, like 30 minutes, you know, whole warm up, and then you get on the floor and you finish your stretches like after crunches or something. And then you do that last stretch on the floor. And that moment where you just like whoa, and go internal and you get vulnerable with yourself because the music's moving you and you do that together, even if it's silent, because dancers aren't there to talk they're gonna move, right like an acting class is different. A singing class is different. But a dance class, you're not there to just necessarily use your voice. You're there to use your body. And so you do that communally silently like atmosphere. around each other, and holy cow, zoom does not do that. And I've taken like some zoom yoga classes and like, I get vulnerable. And like I have like when we get into Shavasana, and like you start, like, getting internal and vulnerable, like, there's a moment for that. And like, I've had some cry moments, but it's not the same.

Amanda LaCount:

It's not the same. It's definitely not the same as like over zoom as in person, but I know what you're talking about. And just in classes in general, when you're with dancers, there's just a energy in the room and a vibe, and you just can't, you can't replace that. It's just something unlike anything else.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh, my gosh.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah. I mean, it's, it's a very relatable post. And as we mentioned, like both of us started, you know, when we were your age, we were still doing the grind in, in New York, and, you know, getting out of college and stuff like that. And Gabrielle, you mentioned, we were talking about our Blackstone's post as well about community and dancing in the studio. And yeah,

Gabrielle Ruiz:

so yeah, I've never worked with Al Blackstone, I've probably I've auditioned him once or twice, but I've been in LA for six years out of the Broadway scene, and I've admired him from afar. So I do follow him on Instagram. And a lot of my Broadway colleagues were posting this over and over and over yesterday and the photo. It's from February 16. And it's a photo of a crowd of dancers, when their own spacial, like separation in class, like a group of like 15 dancers, they're all in their knee, and they're all their heads down. And it's a beautifully choreographically like, perfect moment that was captured in a photo. But the caption says a little bit of says a note to those of you that can't dance at home, or can't afford to rent a studio, or just plain dislike virtual dance classes, you are deeply missed. And you're still an important part of New York City dance community. And I just like it was like a dagger to the heart. Like the amount of open calls and dance auditions where it's just you don't know anybody, you know, three people and you latch on those people. And you're like, I don't know, we're doing what are we doing? What is this? And you know, it'd be like all those moments like, even for the newest crop of talent is not getting that starting last year. Yeah, you know, there's there's a lot of loss in community. And we had a we had a recent recording just with Pallavi and me talking about the weak ties of friendships, like I'm sure, and it's really big in dance classes, especially when you go to public ones, where you don't ever see that one person again, that was so good. Or you see that one person that you know them in another class? Have you ever had those encounters where you've actually made a friend from like, we would call them like a weak tie friendship where you where you think you would never see them again? But then you do? And then do you actually make a relationship? Have you ever had that relationship in the past?

Amanda LaCount:

Oh, yeah, I would say definitely, um, I will say, in general, I'm a person where nothing I don't, I don't make friends easily, or I don't like making friends. But like, I just keep my circle pretty small. And also just for me, when I go to dance classes, I kind of like, I'm in my own lane. Like, I still, it's hard to explain. I'm not like, ignorant, or like, you know, standoffish, but I'm just like, very focused. And I'm like, Okay, I need to learn the piece. I need to, you know, focus on what I'm doing. But I would say one example of this person is I saw her like two classes, like, two or three years ago, and I never really talked to her, I thought she didn't like me. So I was like, mmm okay. And I thought we weren't really gonna be friends. But then we had a mutual friend. And we saw each other at a class. And then I started talking to her. And then now we're pretty good friends today. So I definitely think of that amazing friendships are made in dance classes. Even though like you said before, we're not there to talk. I think some of the best friendships are made in the dance studio, for sure.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, I remember, like one of the things that Gabrielle and I used to talk about with like audition, or audition calls or classes or anything like that, like, you know, it's also like, those are the people that sort of get you and the get get the life that you're in, you know, and so like you can, you can walk down the block out of that class or out of that audition down the block with that person and probably find something in common with them. But then like, you just kind of scatter off and you're like, Oh, I wonder if I'll see her at the next one, you know, or thank you so much for that piece of advice. But like you don't really get to like, you don't necessarily sit down or look for the time to sit down and connect any deeper than that, you know, that's what that the purpose of that relationship is honestly so it's not a good or a bad thing. It's just it is what it is and that serves you it brings value in that way.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I have to say I'm I'm kind of hard on myself on that though. Because when you said that's not a good thing or a bad thing. I went straight to bad like I was just like I should have tried You know, I don't know,

Pallavi Sastry:

I truly like to think that all of us are trying to do the best that we can. Right and like with the tools that we have, and the skills that we have, and like, especially like we know and we talk again, we're, we're quite a bit older than you, but we say all the time that like, we did the best we could with the skills that we had, we didn't know if we needed to know those people better you know, and maybe later on like, we'll just get better at that and we did so you don't I mean, so it's like it's not a bad thing. It's it really is not it's just a lesson we learned.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

That's also when it's when people don't invite you to their weddings. That's when you know that's when I knew like Oh, I thought we were friends. I had 34 people at my wedding I invited nobody okay.

Pallavi Sastry:

But anyway, what I'm trying to say is like Amanda, there is absolutely nothing wrong with keeping a small as their goal there is completely nothing wrong with

Gabrielle Ruiz:

oh my gosh,

Pallavi Sastry:

these old ladies.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

No really, Pallavi? I love diving deep into platonic love with you it has really gotten me through this pandemic.

Pallavi Sastry:

Same here Gabrielle and you know, we are happily working so hard to produce this slay content for all of our listeners.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah, that's why I'm so glad we joined Patreon.

Pallavi Sastry:

Hey, Patreon! Patreon is the opportunity for our listeners to get exclusive perks from us all while supporting our podcast streams.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

What kind of perks Pallavi?

Pallavi Sastry:

Let me tell you about them perks. Okay, our Patreon page has tiers to choose from. So you can pick the waff perks that speak to you, for example, just for joining as a waff friend, patrons automatically get access to the vodcast. Gabrielle tell them what a vodcast is.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

It's the video version of our podcast where you can see us and our guests friends interviewed on camera and wait for it. It's only $2 a month.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yes, it gets better. We are also offering the option to join us for a monthly watch live show and q&a.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Oh my God, that's amazing. So they can ask us about anything.

Pallavi Sastry:

Not only can they ask us anything, there's even a few tiers where they could come on and win a chance to meet our guest friends to ask them anything.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Slay, slay, slay. you know, I think what we're most proud of is that 10% of all proceeds from our Patreon page, go to charity. So not only are we focusing on great content for you, we also get the opportunity to give back.

Pallavi Sastry:

So you're saying that all you got to do to get these perks is join at patreon.com/waffpodcast that's W A F F podcast. And that directly helps us keep making the show.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

That's exactly what I'm saying. Because that's what friends are for. Now back to WAFF. How has it been teaching with creating a community virtually since COVID has started and like what do you Where do you see that going in 2021

Amanda LaCount:

it's been so weird. Because I'm so again, I'm just so used to like going to the dance studio seeing friends like leaving the dance studio super sweaty, and just like disgusting. And that walk back to your car. Like it's just, there's so many things that I miss about, like in person crowded dance classes. But I do think I guess if anything has good has come out of this, I guess I think more people are taking and teaching online classes. And I think that's really good because I think people fail to realize that there's so many people that wish they could take the classes in LA or in New York that can't then maybe live somewhere else or you know, they can't make it to the studio or they can't afford the class are so many different things. So I think it's really beneficial to them that there's a lot more online class options. So maybe more people are getting into dance and starting to love dance and have a passion for dance. So I think that's a positive, but there's more kind of resources for a lot of other people. And I've actually been teaching more in quarantine than I was out of quarantine because now I have time. So now I have time to teach those classes and to do the zoom, you know, classes and stuff like that. So I've been teaching more. That's obviously good for me, it's helping me a lot, you know, growing my choreography and trying to work on it and find my style and who I am as an artist, so there's been positives about it, but I'm not gonna lie. I wish we could go back to how it was a year ago.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

I mean, just even the hug after class, you know, like maybe for one student says thank you and they have that they have that one connection with you. And again, a weak tie. Friendship like you'll never see them again, or you don't expect to but that moment where they're like, thank you so much. This made me feel this way blah, blah, blah, like I mean, do you put that in a chat on zoom? I don't know at least you feel because I mean when I teach when I teach dance classes, I tend to always say first of all, I Follow me get your phones out and follow me on Instagram. Thank you. And then I say, if you ever want to talk about because I do more like arts education with colleges, and you know, I focus on that, I love to tell them if you have any college questions, professional like wanting to pursue this professionally DM me and ask me and just remind me what class you came to. And I would say like one student, one 1.5 students per class, will do that. And I've been, you know, people have asked for referral. Do you stay in contact with students in that way, like, through DMS? And? Yeah,

Amanda LaCount:

um, I would say I try the best I can. I am very This is not me complaining at all about this, but I am lucky enough to have a pretty large platform on social media. So it's, it's kind of difficult to go through every single one to answer you know, with a genuine and you know, real response and not just like, thanks for like, thumbs up, you know, I tried to really respond in a in a good way that makes it seem like I actually care because I do. Um, but there are a few people were like, I've maybe done privates with them. And like three years ago, and they'll DM me, like, one girl came from Hawaii. And I think she was here for like vacation slash taking class slash meeting me, it was kind of like, an interesting situation. But I taught her like to private got all done flowers, and like, it was just so cute. And you know, she dm's me sometimes saying, like, hey, like, still taking class are like, I really wish I could take a class from you again, or something. And I always try to respond to those just because they're so supportive. And, you know, I try to keep a relationship with all the people that I've been able to teach. I do, but it's hard.

Pallavi Sastry:

Well, I will say that, you know, you're very genuine on social media, which is another reason why we connect with you. And, you know, like it, even though you're kind of the next generation down from us, like, we are learning a lot from you about living out loud, being authentic, and

Gabrielle Ruiz:

breaking the stereotype.

Pallavi Sastry:

Yeah, exactly. And standing in your truth standing in your power. And so if you don't mind, I mean, now that we're friends, I hope you don't mind me sharing that, like I'm in this stage in my life I had, my daughter is 18 months old, I had a baby two months ago, and I'm in this like, postpartum stage of like, accepting my new body, you know, and I've always been self conscious about my body. I also work in a cesspool of insecurity called Hollywood. And I've been so self self aware of my shape, and even before this, like incredible miracle that my body performed, which is giving birth, right? But I want to know, like, from you, like, could you give me some friendly advice on how I can live out loud in my new body? Like, it's two sizes bigger than I was ever used to? And I and I'm, I'm still trying to, like, tell myself It's okay. To be loud. You know?

Amanda LaCount:

Yeah, um, I mean, it's so hard. I mean, even me, I try to be a role model to people all over the world to you know, love your body and be body positive. And, you know, to love yourself and be confident. But even I, of course, have days where I'm like, Oh, my gosh, like, I look so bad today, or like, this outfit makes me look fat, or like, I hate this or what, like, of course, I have days like that. And I think it's important because we as humans, not just women as humans, because I feel like a lot of the time the body positivity conversation tends to cater towards women, which is understandable, but I feel like sometimes we forget and like that, you know, men go through it as well. And of course, non binary people as well. Yeah. But I think we tend to focus on like, woman, or woman, whatever you got to say. But I think as just humans, in general, we tend to place so much value in physical appearance and our body. And it's crazy to me, because your body isn't who you are, if that makes sense. Like your personality, your heart, your morals, your like your mind your intelligence, that's who you are. Not the skin, or like the size of your body or your stomach that like digest your food, like why do we put so much value in that you know what I mean? And I think it's important to kind of step back and really realize that the body is just what you live in. It's not who you are as a human, if that makes sense. So I feel like we should put more value into who we are as a person and being kind and loving, genuine caring like those traits instead of worrying about am I size two, am I skinny? Do men think I'm cute? Like, who cares? Like, I just think we need to realize that the body is just, you know, the physical, but the physical isn't important, to me at least, as long as you're healthy. I mean, Of course be healthy but, you know, I think we placed too much value on physical appearance instead of what's inside.

Pallavi Sastry:

Right and healthy can feel you can feel healthy and be any size that's been proven at this point, you know that I know, you know, I think it's but thank you for that. I think it's just you know, I like to I like to hear everybody's perspective because those are those are the those are what I turn into the affirmations you know what I mean? Those are what I turned into the affirmations that I tell myself that it doesn't matter because I'm the vessel is moving forward still doing good things, you know.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And I'll tell you this, Pallavi, you are my inspiration for about to push a baby out of my body. So you did that. So that means I can do that. Right.

Pallavi Sastry:

Right. Thank you.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Don't worry about Amanda Don't Don't even think about that yet. Amanda, do you have none, one or multiple best friends?

Amanda LaCount:

I would say multiple. At least two, there's two friends that I've had been friends with for almost five years now. We went to high school together. And we're just as close as you can get. And I love them with all my heart.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

How do you keep in touch?

Amanda LaCount:

Oh, um texting. Of course. We send each other a lot of funny videos that we think are funny, at least. Me and one of my best friends share music constantly. We have very similar music tastes. So we share our jams that we think they'll like. And then also just you know, sometimes we FaceTime, zoom, getting that face to face interaction. But I really wish I could see him in person. But we're making it work. We're being safe.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

In one word, or a hyphenate. What kind of friend are you? For instance, examples are? You're a problem solver. You're a listener. You're needy, blunt,

Amanda LaCount:

huh. That's so hard. Um, I would say overdramatic both in and in the negative. I tend to overreact about a lot of things. My friends know this, but I also tend to like, I'm a what's the word like an overachiever as well. So maybe like an overachiever and overdramatic in friendships. For example, like birthdays, I go crazy. I make handmade gifts. One year, I wrote down like 364 things I love about my best friend or something. And I, I hand write my cards and I make scrapbooks. Like, I'm just very that friend. That's me.

Pallavi Sastry:

You're like extra? The best way?

Amanda LaCount:

Yeah, exactly. I

Pallavi Sastry:

couldn't. Friend.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

That's what I think I think best extra friend. Oh, yeah. You're the best extra friend. The next question is, what would you like to do better as a friend?

Amanda LaCount:

What would I like to do better? I think there's so many things that I could improve on. I'm sure. It's so hard. Because I feel like we're so quick to like, give ourselves compliments, or at least I am. And then when it comes to like, what do you need to work on? I'm like, I don't know, I should think about that more.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

It could be it can be a short term goal. It doesn't have to be like life changing.

Amanda LaCount:

I would say maybe like, ask how they're doing more. Maybe I talked to my friends often, but I feel like most of the time, you know, we're talking about funny stuff or, or just kind of random things. So maybe just kind of asking more often, you know, how are you doing? Like, actually? How are you feeling? Because I feel like I never asked that. And they might need to rant to someone or, you know, just unleash all their emotions. So I should do that more properly.

Pallavi Sastry:

Amanda, our final question, our iconic question is Amanda, What are friends for?

Amanda LaCount:

Oh, my gosh, friends are for so many different things. I would say overall there for support. I think whenever I'm having a hard time, my friends are the first people I turn to after my mom, of course. But without the friends I have, I think I would be a very different person. And I think they shape who you are as a person. And I think like I said, they're supportive. They make your life more enjoyable and more happy and just exciting. Hopefully, at least, that's what my friends do for me. Um, but I would say overall, they're there to support you.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Well, we support you because we're now friends. Also, we just completely we just completely have admired you from afar. We're so glad you were able to come on waff What are friends for?

Amanda LaCount:

Thank you for having me. This was so fun.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Thank you, Amanda.

Pallavi Sastry:

Thank you. Bye 1234 This episode was produced by Team Access productions and Fast Nickel Inc.. Our s pervising producer is Philip

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Our consulting producers are Kathleen Choe and Rose Harwood

Pallavi Sastry:

lead production assistant is at Anna Dannec er, digital content director is usi Cabello, our production assi tants of Daniela Heredia Vega, S laire Olsen, and Megann B

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Our podcast artwork is created by Aishwarya Sukesh original music by Joie herman and special thanks to rresistible force publicity and ari Savitala

Pallavi Sastry:

please remember to subscribe rate and review this podcast wherever you're listening now, this helps our shows visibility and helps us keep making it for you.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

And find us on all the socials Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and TikTok @w ffpodcast. That's W A F F podc st to find links to our excl sive podcasts, live shows shop merch, even Text us visit waf podcast.com

Pallavi Sastry:

we truly appreciate you all checking in with us online. We know that friend that you've been like, ah, I really haven't checked in with them in a while. Go do that.

Gabrielle Ruiz:

Yeah, go do that. Now.